Showing 5 comments
  • Alexander Hrin
    Reply

    Ah…the good old 555 IC. This looks pretty cool, Kevin. Make sure you have the schematic down–I’m going to want you to explain it to me! Looking forward to what you continue to do with the summer.

    -Mr. Hrin

  • Alexander Hrin
    Reply

    I never got to use anything as cool as flex sensors when I took my circuits classes. I do have a question–the writing on the Arduino board schematic is a bit hard to read, but I was curious as to where/if you have the high voltage going into the board? Doesn’t it need an input DC voltage so it can generate the 5 V that’s being applied to the flex sensors? Great Work!

    -Mr. Hrin

  • Kevin H.
    Reply

    Hi Mr. Hrin!

    Thanks for asking! I responded via email to the first comment, but I’ll leave both responses as comments in case school faculty email are deactivated over summer. As for the first comment, I held onto the circuit schematic for the exploding star organ, and I’m definitely expecting to be grilled on how the components work together. For the second comment, flex sensors are pretty fun to work with! Additionally, my laptop is connected to the Arduino with a USB cable to provide power. Let me know if you have any more questions!

    Best,
    Kevin

  • Alexander Hrin
    Reply

    This is really neat, Kevin! You’ve even got your own version of the carpal tunnel. I’m glad that I’ve been able to get updates periodically throughout the summer (this is a subtle suggestion that you should tell the rest of your physics crew that they should send me an update too ;)). I do have to take issue with one thing you have in your description–I believe that the lines are acting as tendons, not ligaments. In anatomy, tendons attach muscle to bone, and thus they are responsible for the motion of limbs/digits, while ligament are responsible for connecting bone to bone so that different bones don’t go sliding off in weird directions. In the hand, the ligaments would be responsible for keeping the finger bones aligned so that they curl properly when they get pulled on. In your hand, the ligaments would be the pins/rivets that the finger pieces pivot on. Sorry if it’s nit-picky, but that’s what you get when you have your science teacher review your project. I really liked the way that you fit the servos into the forearm area–I’m sure that it took some doing. Looking forward to your next update!

    -Mr. Hrin

    • Kevin H.
      Reply

      Hi Mr. Hrin!
      It has about the same range of motion as William Cao’s hands. I’ll be sure to fix that on that website; all I can really say is that’s why I’m taking post-AP physics instead of bio! Putting the servos into the forearm was definitely a challenging task (you can see that I actually cracked the plastic in the Servo 2 Padding image), but attaching the lines onto the servo horns was much more difficult in my opinion. I’ll tell the others to say hi!
      -Kevin

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BlueStamp and COVID-19 Summer 2020 was fully remote and a huge success! We hope to offer both remote and in person programming for 2021! More Information