RC Robot Tank

The RC Robot Tank is a mobile tank that is remotely controlled by a dismantled PS2 controller. It’s able to move forward, backward, and turn. It consists of a universal plate, an Arduino, a motor shield, a Tamiya track and wheel set, a 6v Tenergy battery pack and a double gearbox motor.

Engineer

Jo S

Area of Interest

Mechanical Engineering

School

Bard High School Early College

Grade

Incoming Junior

First Milestone

So far, the tank is only a body with wheels, a motor and a battery pack. The Arduino and motor shield will be added in my later milestones. The motor is connected to the track and wheel set, but the battery pack isn’t connected to the motor. 

How the tank works so far:

The wheels can turn and are connected by a rubber track. I had to assemble the motor myself. The motor is a double gearbox motor so the two motors run independently from each other. This means that the two tracks can run in opposite directions at the same time, giving the tank more mobility. The battery pack is a Tenergy 6v battery pack, and is rechargeableA universal plate holds the motor, battery pack and wheels together. I had to cut a piece off of the universal plate to fit the double gearbox motor on to the plate.

Here is a link to the RC Robot Tank site for reference

Second Milestone

For my second milestone, I connected the Arduino and the motor shield with jumper wires and other stripped wires. I then coded the Arduino so that it would tell the motor shield to run a simple sequence of moving forward, doing a 180 degree turn and moving forward again to its original position. The tank would then repeat that until I turned it off.

Starter Project – Useless Machine

The Useless Machine is a device that allows the user to push a button, and when that button is pushed an arm connected to a motor pushes the button back. It’s covered in a black plastic covering to protect the electronics inside. 

https://www.spikenzielabs.com/Catalog/index.php?main_page=index&cPath=51&zenid=d8ce6323ab31b4b64995fc89909179ba

How it works

The Useless Machine uses a battery powered motor connected to a PCB, a printed circuit board, which propels a plastic arm out of the shell of the box to push the switch. When the switch is not pushed, the Useless Machine is off, and turns on when the switch is pushed by the user. There are a few main components of the Useless Machine: three AAA batteries, a PCB, a switch a plastic arm and an LED or Light Emitting Diode light. A diode is a device with two electric terminals that allow the flow of electricity in only one direction. The batteries send electricity to the PCB which has two resistors to control the current. A small switch controls the use of the arm. There is also an LED light which turns on when the machine does.

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