Omni-directional Robot

The Omni-directional Robot is not any ordinary robot. This specialized robot can travel in any direction and rotate at any time. I used an Arduino Uno to program the robot, this robot also contains 3 omni wheels and a wooden structure. This project used a lot of math, like trigonometry and vectors, to coordinate the wheels movements.

Engineer

Henok T

Area of Interest

Mechanical/Electrical Engineering

School

Dougherty Valley High School

Grade

Incoming Junior

Engineer

Henok T

Area of Interest

Mechanical/Electrical Engineering

School

Dougherty Valley High School

Grade

Incoming Junior

FINAL MILESTONE

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Second Milestone

For my Second Milestone, I controlled two motor controllers attached to a wheel using a ps2 controller. This milestone was a pretty exciting objective to complete because it reassured my progress on my main project. I was expecting to get it done in about a week but I got it done fairly quickly. The way I did it was I connected the motors to the output pins on my L298N module (H bridge), the module was then connected to the Arduino through IN switches and PWM pins. On the ps2 controller side, I wired the Arduino to the input pins on the ps2 controller wireless receiver (data, command, clock, and attention). I had to use 2 H bridge’s because each H bridge holds 2 wheels and I have 3 wheels. With this in mind, I had to split up my 2 H bridge’s power supply on a breadboard. I did it this way because of complication issues and once that worked, everything was in check. As far as the coding, I  finalized the code for my motors to work as well as for my Arduino to read the ps2 receiver input pins. Once I had them working separately I combined both of them together. I basically coded the motors to rotate forward or backward based on what button was pressed on the ps2 controller.

First Milestone

My first milestone was for the Omni-directional Robot is to have one wheel work/rotate using just the Arduino code. This was a big step for me because it gave me a lot of confidence going into this project and it allowed me to have 3 working wheels and to also start working on the ps2 controller. I basically powered up a L298N module with a battery and connected the L298N’S switches and motors to the Arduino. Then I built the wheel and connected that to the H bridge (L298N) output pins. Not only did I have to do Mechanical work but Software (coding) as well. The way the coding worked was the Arduino uses a C language that interprets commands as High or Low. As explained in the video the H bridge (L298N Module) has 4 switches in a open circuit that are opened and closed by the Arduino. I commanded those switches to be open or closed in a certain sequence for all motors using High or Low. It was also important to define the pins to what switch I want for a specific motor.

Starter Project

My Starter Project is the customizable Arduino, I chose to use a fully customized Arduino using LED’s and a motion sensor. The three main components of my project are a motion sensor, an LED, and an Arduino Uno. I enjoyed this project because I was able to learn about the different electrical components and their roles in this circuit as well as how to use the Arduino.

Demonstration

How it works

The customizable Arduino is composed of 3 components, the Arduino Uno board, an LED, and a motion sensor. The Motion Sensor has 3 wires, the ground (white), the signal (black), and the power (red). The 5v that is provided to the Motion Sensor through the red wire is supplied from the Arduino power pin by the breadboard. The ground (white wire) is connected to the GND pin on the Arduino. Finally, the signal wire (black) cannot output 1’s and only outputs 0’s, which is what the C language interprets as inputs as the Arduino reads it, so it has to connect to a 5v source by default. This is done by using the breadboard and resistors to safely transport the 1’s as an 5v power through the resistor (on the breadboard) to the LED without burning it out. I also had to connect this  signal source back to where it was originally supposed to be connected, the signal pin on the Arduino (pin 2). As for the LED, it needed a output pin to be connected to which was pin 13 on the Arduino board.

These are the instructions

LED/Motion Sensor Customizable Arduino Schematic

Henok T.
Image Source: https://github.com/adafruit/Adafruit-MiniPOV4-Kit/tree/master/Hardware

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