Intelligent Door Lock

The Intelligent Door Lock uses technology to capture a picture of a person at the door and emails the image to the owner. This would require a Raspberry Pi, a “small computer” to send off the email to the owner. Then the owner gets to decide whether or not they would like to open the door. The Raspberry Pi is connected with a camera module and sends data to an Arduino using a serial cable. 

Engineer

Edwin T.

Area of Interest

Computer Engineering

School

Newtown High School

Grade

Incoming Senior

Third Milestone

Second Milestone

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How it works

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What I learned?

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For my second milestone, I successfully programmed the Raspberry Pi to capture an image using the camera module. Then , I programmed the Raspberry Pi to send the captured image to my email. The process occurs with the code command “raspistill -o image.jpg && python sendmail.py”. The code “raspistill -o image.jpg” captures an image from the camera module (see image 2) and stores it and “python sendmail.py” takes the captured image and attaches it to the email when sent. All of this is written in the command line.

Demonstration

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Image 1: Camera Module v2 installed in Raspberry Pi

Image 2: Code file of how captured image is sent through email (Clearer version in below)

Image 3: Image captured by camera module

Image 4: Email that was sent from Raspberry Pi

How it works

First, the Raspberry Pi Camera module had to be installed, so I inserted the cable into the Raspberry Pi. The slot is situated between the Ethernet and HDMI ports, with the silver connectors of the camera module facing the HDMI port. After it’s connected, I booted up the Raspberry Pi. Once it was on, I ran the code “sudo raspi-config” on the command line. If the “camera” option is not listed, you would run “sudo apt-get update” and “sudo apt-get upgrade”, then the “camera” option would show up and I, the user, would enable it. To capture an image in jpeg format, I would run “raspistill -o image.jpg” into  the terminal, where “image.jpg” is the desired name of the captured image.

Then the user creates a file in the terminal. I named mine “sendemail.py” (in order to write one, you would run “sudo nano sendemail.py”). I followed  “Send an HTML Email with Embedded Image and Plain Text” to set up the process of sending an email with image being attached in the email. I will also include the full code file of what I used below with some changes I did.

With that, the user  would run “raspistill -o image.jpg” first so it would take a picture of someone’s face. Then run “python sendemail.py” which would send the captured image of the face to your email.

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Flowchart of How Email is Sent with Captured Image

What I learned?

I learned how to code and comment, create prints and attach files. I was able to set it up separately,  but couldn’t combine both into one. I was able to take images with a command by itself and send an email with a message. I learned how to solve issues that I ran into this milestone. I would research if others have been through the same situation and many have, so I followed what they did.

First Milestone

For my first milestone I successfully installed Raspbian and installed Python on the Raspberry Pi.  I was able to connect the Raspberry Pi with the monitor, in this case a computer, as well as a keyboard and mouse. I also successfully downloaded NOOBS, a way to make setting up a Raspberry Pi for the first time much, much easier. I also installed Python on the command line by running “sudo apt-get install python”.

Demonstration

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Image 1: Shows all components plugged into the Raspberry Pi

Image 2: Shows Raspbian downloaded

Image 3: Shows Python installed in command line terminal

This project uses a Raspberry Pi that uses coding to send off the email to your phone or any other electronic device. The Raspberry Pi is a credit-card sized “small computer” that plugs into a computer monitor or TV, and uses a standard keyboard and mouse. It is a capable device that enables people to explore computing, and to learn how to program in languages like Python. First, NOOBS has to be installed to the Raspberry Pi’s Micro SD card. NOOBS is a zip file that includes software for setting up Raspberry Pi, including the Raspbian operating system into a 32 GB of data storage. After installing the Raspbian Operating System, Python has to be installed with the code: “Sudo apt-get install python-serial”. Terminal is a window which allows users to input commands that directly manipulate their Raspberry Pi’s system. Python is a general-purpose programming language. It is for developing both desktop and web applications and also designed with features to facilitate data analysis and visualization.

Shows plug in of Raspberry Pi

What I learned?

I learned what a Raspberry Pi is as I never heard of one before. I also learned how to code using Python. Python is one of various coding languages that can interact with the Raspberry Pi. Most code for the camera and the Pi itself comes from Python files. Having the prefix “sudo” which stands for “super user do” gives the code certain elevated privileges to perform certain administrative tasks such as listing the objects in a file and shutting down the system. I used the website codeacademy.com to learn the basics of Python. 

Starter Project

My Starter Project is MintyBoost a small and simple, yet powerful, way to charge your favorite gadgets like cameras, cell phones, and any other gadgets you can plug into a USB port to charge. The MintyBoost uses two AA batteries to charge your gadget in minutes. The MintyBoost kit includes all electronic parts to build your own USB charger.

Demonstration

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Image 1. Finished product (Closed)

Image 2. Finished product (Open)

Image 3. Finished product with solder (Backside)

Image 4. Finished PCB with wires (Frontside)

How it works

The MintyBoost uses two AA batteries that provide 1.5 volts each and then it goes through the circuit in which resistors are placed that limit the flow of electricity to not overheat other components. There is a boost converter is the most important part of the circuit because it takes the 1.5 volts from each battery, which is 3 volts flowing through the circuit and turning that into 6 volts which are required to charge any device like an iPhone. The ceramic capacitors help stabilize the output voltage and filters out high-frequency noise so that the 5V output is nice and smooth, it also stabilizes the internal reference of the boost converter chip. The Schottky diode is part of the boost converter, which is essentially used to make sure that voltage stays constant. The two electrolytic capacitors help smooth both the input and output voltages, to keep them stable during the transfer of energy. The charger circuitry and the two AA batteries fit into an Altoids gum tin and will run for hours.

 

These are the instructions

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